Historically, the Rite of Passage ceremony has served to initiate a person into a society or community. Typically, this pivotal point in a person’s life happens within a group. Sometimes the group is enacting upon one person, sometimes the whole group itself is involved in the process. In the end, there is usually growth, a heightened sense of development and awareness, and possibly a change in social status. But what do Rites of Passage look like now, in this modern age? We are so consumed by media and technology that even our minuscule social interactions have changed. How has this affected our development? How has this affected our ability to empathize?

Antigone Chambers Reed is a poet and writer, actor, and human rights activist. Based in Saint Louis, she has lived in both Memphis and New Orleans. In her down-time, she enjoys cooking, film, and traveling. She performs poetry with Saint Louis Story Stitchers, a group that addresses the roots of gun violence and seeks to uplift affected communities through media enter-tainment. She is also an actor with the Bread and Roses Workers Theater. As of right now, she is competing to become the next Saint Louis Youth Poet Laureate.